Works in the Museum Collection
Title:  Our Lady of the Holy Sign
Artist: French iconographer, Sister Laure Morel of the Community of Grandchamps (Switzerland)
Medium: tempera on wood panel, 1993
 
Title:  Saint Martin of Tours
Artist: 
Colombian iconographer, Fernando Arango-Fernandez
Medium: 
Tempera on wood panel, 2007
 
Title:  Jesus Pantakrator (Jesus the All-Powerful blessing)
Artist:
Monique Sinclair  (USA)
Medium:  Oil on wood crate (2005). 
Donated by the Artist.
 
Title:  Deisis
Central panel:  the Crucifixion with St. Mary the Virgin and St. John the Evangelist
Left panel: The Resurrection
Right panel:  Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemos entombing Jesus; bottom, a cherub
Artist:  Daniel Berhanemeskel  (Ethiopia) Medium:   Acrylic on wood, triptych with portable doors(2008) Coptic tradition.
Collection:  Bishop Tajra
Gift of Lady Susan Tajra-Jacobson (France).
Title: The Road Less Traveled
Artist:  Caterina Lionti
Medium:  
Fractal Mixed Media Painting Giclee Print, Acrylic Paint, Mica Infused Medium
Collection:  Bishop Tajra
Donated by the Artist

This is the first Fractal painting to enter the Permanent Collection.  Done in the Surrealist style so reminiscent of the art of Salvador Dali, the painting is a powerful meditation on humanity's fall from divine grace and its subsequent redemption through the ministry of Jesus Christ, Light of the world.

 
Prayer beads are a part of the traditional piety of many Christian churches as well as a devotional item in many other religious traditions around the world. The picture depicts a five decade Christian rosary made out of corn husks by the Mayan Native Americans at Merida in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.
Gift of Mr. Dennis Maloney (USA)  (2006)
Collection:  Bishop Tajra

 

 
Five decade Rosary
Olive wood, silver medal. Bethlehem, Palestinian Christian artists (1971)
Collection of: Bishop Tajra
 
Title: The Potter of Jeremiah the Prophet.
Artist: Henri Lindegaard  (France)
Medium: Woodcut (1980).
Gift of the artist.
Collection of: Bishop Tajra
 
Title: Mary, Ark of the New Covenant: A Meditation on the Cathedral of Amiens
Artist: Paula C. Foster (USA)
Medium:  Collage/Mixed Media (2004)
The 13th Century Cathedral of Amiens, in Picardy, Northern France, is the purest and most perfect example of French High Gothic architecture. For centuries there was grouped in the Cathedral a Confraternity dedicated to the veneration of Notre-Dame du Puits, protectress of that noble edifice. The spiritual profundity of this devotion to the Blessed Lady of the Well generated a school of Late Mediaeval and Renaissance sacred artists (L'Ecole d'Amiens) whose work transmits  ancient Christian doctrinal themes in the exciting, new Renaissance style. In her mixed media painting/collage, Paula C. Foster has depicted these various historical facts while enveloping the viewer in a deeply spiritual atmosphere.
Donated by the Artist.
 
Title:  Maice Indurerata:  A Meditation on the suffering Mother
Artist:  Georgeta Maria Iuga  (Romania)
Medium:  Tempera on Glass.(1999).
Gift of  French journalist Marie-Gabrielle Leblanc.

Collection of: Bishop Tajra
 
Title: The House of Our Lady of Ephesus (interior).
Artist: Jean Wagner Troemel (USA).
Medium:  Oil/alkyd on canvas. (2005).
Donated by the Artist.  A pendant by the same artist shows the exterior of the House, located at Ephesus, Turkey. The House is a shrine, a house of prayer, and a place of pilgrimage for both Christians and Muslims.
St. Mary the Virgin is mentioned on multiple occasions in both the New Testament and the Quran.
 
Title: The Praying Madonna.
Artist:  Jan Lavallee (USA).     
Medium: Acrylic on wood  (2008).
Gift of the Artist.
Collection of: Bishop Tajra
 
Title: Virgin and Child.
Artist:  Monique Sinclair.
Medium: Oil on Canvas
  (2008).

 
Title: Madonna and Child
Artist: Friar Cornelio Tuscano, cmsf. (India)
Medium:  Painting on Bodhi Leaf
Friar Cornelio, an Indian Franciscan monk, has deftly combined a traditional Indian art form with the Christian theme of the Incarnation. Friar Cornelio was posted for many years in the historic Church of San Paolo alla Regola in Rome, thought by many scholars to be the site of Saint Paul's house during the Apostle's two-year captivity in the Eternal City. This work was a gift of the artist to Bishop Tajra on the occasion of the Bishop's visit to the church in 1990 while he was doing research for his book (The Martyrdom of Saint Paul).
Collection of: Bishop Tajra
 
Title: Saint Michael Archangel.
Medium:  Poster
Part of the Museum's poster collection, this work announces the (Tresors de Chypre) Exhibition held at the Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris in 1967. This seminal exposition was of paramount importance in introducing the glories of the art of the island of Cyprus to the Parisian public.
Collection of: Bishop Tajra

Title:  The Meditation of Ruth
Artist: 
Jean Wagner Troemel
Medium:
 
Alkyd on Canvas (2004)
Gift of the Artist

The painting is a study of the haunting gaze of Ruth, wife of Boaz, and ancestress of Our Lord Jesus Christ as she meditates centuries of time beforehand the birth of the world's Redeemer, her descendent. The ecstasy of Ruth occurs at the precise moment when she fully comprehends by divine inspiration that Jesus Christ's future birth will be the culminating point of her family's raison d'etre.

To Ruth is attributed one of the most beautiful moments of poetry in Old Testament in her words to her mother-in-law, Naomi (Ruth I,16):    "Whither thou goest, I will go: and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God."

 

Title:  On the Beautiful and the Sublime: A Meditation on Church and Snake
Artist: 
Donald Pridgen
Medium:
 
Acrylic on Bristol Board
Gift of the Artist

In this colorful geometric abstract, Florida artist, Donald Pridgen, invites the viewer to meditate on the beautiful, which is pure faith, represented by the welcoming Church doors, open -- in a loving and inclusive manner -- to all seekers after faith , as well as to meditate on the sublime, which is the danger, fear, horror and nothingness of the human condition without God. He represents the notion of the sublime about which the 18th Century philosopher John Locke spoke, as a serpent-demon, the ancient tempter of Eve, responsible for the fall of the human race. The green snake can maculate the glow of the Divine Illumination as represented by the round solar disk, but it cannot obliterate the Increate Light of God; for justice and righteousness triumph in the end.

 

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